Our favorite fictional books

MadaLin:

1) Pride and Prejudice (released 1812 by Jane Austen)

2) Revolution (released 2011 by Jennifer Donnely)

3) Entwined (released 2011 by Heather Dixon)

4) Memoirs of a Geisha (released 1997 by Arthur Golden)

5) The Godess Test series (released starting 2011 by Aimee Carter)

6) Abandoned (released 2012 by Meg Cabot)

7) Alice in Wonderland (Lewis Caroll)

8) Nevermore (released 2010 Kelley Crayg)

9) Enchanted (released 2011 by Aleathea Kontis)

10) Splintered (released 2013 by A.G. Howard)

Honorable mention: “Treachery of Beautiful Things” released 2012 by Ruth Francis Long

Nicole:

1) Eragon [The Inheritance Cycle] (released starting 2001 by Christopher Paolini)

2) To Kill a Mockingbird (released 1961 by Harper Lee)

3) The Hunger Games trilogy (released starting 2008 by Suzanne Collins)

4) Wuthering Heights (by Emily Bronte)

5)Frankenstien (released 1815 by Mary Shelley)

6) Holes (released 1998 by Louis Sachar)

7)Tell-Tale heart (released 1843 by Edgar Allen Poe)

8) Divergent (released 2011 by Veronica Roth)

9) Hunchback assignments (released 2009 by Arthur Slade)

10) 20,000 Leagues under the sea (by Jules Verne)

 

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A awesomely short review Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a Zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.”
Pride and Prejudice was published by romance novelist Jane Austen in the year 1813.

Nearly two centuries later, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies was released by Seth Grahame-Smith.

He has been praised as having taken a dead story and injected life into it once more. Though how he has done so by filling it with undead creatures is a mystery to us.

We here at Barton Hollow are rallying for a film adaptation to be made, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Mr. Darcy, and Tom Hiddleston as Mr. Bingley. (Whosoever is cast as the Bennet sisters is of no consequence to us, so long as Mr. Cumberbatch and Mr. Hiddleston grace the screen.)

We give it five stars.

Q. (Nicole) Describe to me what it is that Mr. Grahame-Smith has done to this well-beloved classic.

A. (MadaLin) He has infected it with a awesome flavor of 21st century sci-fi! Most notably Zombies. He has written in incidents with Zombies (called, thoughtout the book, Unmentionables, much to our good humour) and has also done the unthinkable in adding to Mr. Darcy’s list qualifacations for the perfect woman.

Q. No! In what way?

Mr. Darcy now thinks less of an accomplished piano-forte player and more of a knife-wielder! Since this “grevious plague” has infected England, former luxuries and marks of high society are now seen as tomfoolery.

Q. But of course, Elizabeth Bennet still passes his test.

Of course. The major pinnacles of the story line are unchanged, but they all bear the aroma of undead.

Q. Do you feel Jane Austen would approve of this re-making?

A. I think a lot of people feel that Jane Austen is rolling over in her grave (hah hah hah), but personally I think she was rather quirky enough to enjoy it.

Q. Do you think her “quirkiness” was well received by pre-victorian society?

A. Perhaps not in her own time, there were many throughout history who disapproved of her works, (I.E. the Bronte Sisters, and surprisingly Winston Churchill) but for every one mark of disdain there is an incalculable multitude who adore them.

Q. Pride and Prejudice is always widely spoken of, but tell me what the plot actually is about.

On the surface, it is about a rather spastic mother of five daughters who (understandably) wishes to see them marry well. However, this desire often overtakes what small sprinkling of common sense she operates under.

Q. Describe each daughter to me.

Jane, the eldest, is extremely sweet and loving.

Elizabeth is slightly sassy-smart.

Mary, quiet, contemplative, and a bit of a know-it-all.

Catherine (Kitty), who is a follower acting mainly under the instruction of

Lydia, the youngest. She is rather self-absorbed.

Q. Tell me about the marriages in the book.

The first to marry is the youngest, Lydia. Against her parent’s wishes, she at sixteen elopes with Mr. George Wickham.

Next, Catherine Deburg attempts to keep Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy apart, owing to Elizabeth’s poverty.

The eldest sister, Jane, marries Mr. Bingley.

Elizabeth marries Mr. Darcy, and they live happily ever after, with both love an money, as do all of Miss Austen’s characters.

Favorite Quotes-

“My sore throats are always worse than anyone’s…” – Lydia

“Any savage can dance!” – Mr. Darcy